post

Hollywood or Bust Wins Award

This month the National Indie Excellence Awards (NIEA) announced the winners of its annual contest. The competition was created to acknowledge self-publishers and small and independent presses that go the extra mile to produce high quality books, from eye-catching design to well-written content. Judges represent all aspects of the industry and include publishers, writers, editors, book cover designers and professional copywriters.

HorB CoverAuthor Susan Marg entered her book Hollywood or Bust in the category “Arts& Entertainment.” It was the perfect fit. Hollywood or Bust consists of over five hundred quips, quotes, and off-the-cuff remarks of actors, directors, writers, and others involved in making movies and conveys what Hollywood insiders think of themselves, their lives, their fame, their careers, each other, and the town itself.

Marg is pleased that this well-regarded organization recognized her efforts. “Hollywood or Bust was a lot of work, but it was fun to research and put together,” she comments, adding, “It’s a fun read, too – like overhearing a conversation at Starbucks.”

Hollywood or Bust, ISBN 978-0-578-11882-6, is a 182-page paperback book consisting of seven chapters and twenty original photographs.  Topics cover dreams of success to attending the Oscars.  It lists for $14.95.

###

 Susan Marg is the author of Las Vegas Weddings: A Brief History, Celebrity Gossip, Everything Elvis, and the Complete Chapel Guide, published by HarperCollins.  Since she has moved her field of focus from the City of Lights to the City of Angels, her interest in popular culture has only intensified.

Advertisements
post

Mickey Mouse Rules

When you sit down to Thanksgiving dinner, stand up for Mickey Mouse’s “House of Mouse Rules”:

No smoking. No villainous schemes. And no guests eating other guests.

Photo by: J.E. Skodak

Photo by: J.E. Skodak

Happy Thanksgiving!

image

Seen and Heard on Hollywood Boulevard:

“I only have to do three things to look halfway decent—curl my eyelashes, fill in my eyebrows, and put some lipstick on.” – Courtney Cox

“I only have to do three things to look halfway decent—curl my eyelashes, fill in my eyebrows, and put some lipstick on.” – Courtney Cox

Hot Lips. Loose Lips. Read My Lips.

 

 

 

 

“I like to drive with my knees. Otherwise, how can I put on my lipstick and talk on the phone?” – Sharon Stone

“I like to drive with my knees. Otherwise, how can I put on my lipstick and talk on the phone?” – Sharon Stone

 

 

 

 

 

 

“You can't keep changing men, so you settle for changing your lipstick.” – Heather Locklear

“You can’t keep changing men, so you settle for changing your lipstick.” – Heather Locklear

“If I walk outside without lipstick, I feel naked.” – Sofia Vergara

“If I walk outside without lipstick, I feel naked.” – Sofia Vergara

“Adding sound to movies would be like putting lipstick on the Venus de Milo.” – Mary Pickford

“Adding sound to movies would be like putting lipstick on the Venus de Milo.” – Mary Pickford (photo by: Mattgirling/Ga

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post

On Hollywood Boulevard: Something Old, Something New

Some of the cast of Ocean's Eleven? No, it's Harpo, Groucho, Zeppo, and Chico Marx with Sid Grauman - 1933. Photo from: Dennis Amith

Some of the cast of Ocean’s Eleven? No, it’s Harpo, Groucho, Zeppo, and Chico Marx with Sid Grauman – 1933. Photo from: Dennis Amith

Hollywood’s Chinese Theatre was reopened in September after a four-month renovation.  Now called TCL, rather than Grauman’s, after a Chinese television manufacturer bought naming rights, the venue now has one of the country’s largest IMAX screens and almost a thousand stadium seats, once again spacious enough to host movie premieres and accommodate the attendant paparazzi.

But the best news for movie fans?  The iconic imprints of our favorite superstars are still in place.

In 1927 Douglas Fairbanks, and Mary Pickford, the King of Hollywood and America’s Sweetheart, as well as co-owners of the theater with Sid Grauman, were the first to officially step in wet cement.  They each had their own square smack dab in front of the entrance.

Many others, by themselves, as a couple, or in a group, have followed.

It must be lonely on the range because singing cowboys signed for themselves and their horse. If you look around, you’ll find Tom Mix and Tony, Gene Autry and Champion, Roy Rogers and Trigger.  “Happy trails” to you and your four-legged partner, too.

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers are co-located, although he got his square in 1938 and she followed, as usual, one year later.

Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy share space, as do Bud Abbott and Lou Costello. Harpo, Zeppo, Chico, and Groucho, who also left an imprint of his cigar, fell all over themselves to get their hands dirty.

When Gentlemen Prefer Blondes was released in 1953, Jane Russell and Marilyn Monroe were memorialized in adjoining areas, writing the movie title above their signatures. Three years later in honor of the movie Giant, Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, and director George Stevens left their mark on the same day. If this was some sort of stunt to publicize their movies, who cares?

Certainly not Brad Pitt, George Clooney, and Matt Damon fans. A big crowd greeted them and producer Jerry Weintraub of Ocean’s Eleven, Twelve, and Thirteen at their signing-in ceremony in 2007. As Clooney said, “If I had to be on my hands and knees with three other guys, I can’t think of three better guys to do it with.”

Do you think the Star Trek cast plus creator Gene Roddenberry were thinking the same thing when they were honored with a square in 1991? After all, together they had gone “where no man has gone before.” They are to the right of the box office. Star Wars stars Darth Vader, R2D2, and C3PO are on the left.

More recently the Twilight Saga‘s Robert Pattinson, Kristen Stewart, and Taylor Lautner celebrated the release of Breaking Dawn — Part 1 by participating in this Hollywood tradition.  Stewart summed up the experience exclaiming, “I think this is the coolest thing ever.”

If the past is a guide to the future, as an ancient Chinese proverb divines, the popularity of the Chinese Theatre, regardless of its name, is ensured for a long time to come.

© 2013 Susan Marg – All Rights Reserved

post

My Facebook Fan Page

Charlie Chaplin eats his boot in "The Gold Rush."

Charlie Chaplin eats his boot in “The Gold Rush.”

I have created a Facebook fan page for Hollywood or Bust: Movie Stars Dish on Following their Dreams, Making it Big, and Surviving in Tinseltown.

But the best part: for every “like”, comments count, too, I am donating a penny to the Motion Picture and Television Fund (MPTF). Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, and D.W. Griffith, also founders of United Artists started this private, non-profit charity  over 90 years ago  to help those in the movie industry who had fallen on hard times.  It hasn’t gotten any easier.  Today the fund serves more than 150,000 people annually with healthcare and other social services.

Charlie Chaplin once said, “We all want to help one another. Human beings are like that. We want to live by each other’s happiness, not by each other’s misery.”

So, please, go to Facebook and “like” Hollywood or Bust: Movie Stars Dish.  And if you love silents, film noir, westerns, or some other genre on the silver or small screen, ask your friends to ask their friends. The pennies will add up.

Ready, set, click.   Thank you.

——————————————

For more information on MPTF, visit: http://www.mptf.com

post

Five Years Ago in Popular Culture: The Death of a Gentleman

Newman and Woodard 1960.

Newman and Woodard 1960.

Unflappable, Unbeatable. Unforgettable. Paul Newman, also known as King Cool, died five years ago at the age of 83.  Known for his philanthropic generosity and passion racing cars, as well as his stage and screen presence, his career spanned decades.

Newman made his movie debut in 1954 in The Silver Chalice, a historical drama, for which he later apologized for his performance.  No matter.  By 1958 he was one of the hottest new stars in Hollywood, going tête-à-tête with Elizabeth Taylor in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958) and Eva Marie Saint in Exodus (1960).

Newman also went mano a mano with his equally celebrated male costars. In 1961 he appeared on the silver screen in The Hustler with Jackie Gleason.  Twenty-five years later he reprised his role as “Fast Eddie” in The Color of Money with Tom Cruise.

Fellow actor Robert Redford and Newman formed a special bond.  Their easy-going camaraderie, in evidence in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973), spilled over to life itself.

When asked if he would make a sequel with Redford following Redford’s Indecent Proposal (1993), Newman replied, “”Like a rocket!” Then he added, “I’d shack up with anyone for a million dollars. I’d shack up with a gorilla for a million, plus 10 percent.”

Redford might not have been as pleased to be on a set with Newman again.  “He tells the worst jokes.  And that wouldn’t be so bad if he didn’t keep repeating them over and over.”

Newman’s relationship with actress Joanne Woodward also began on a movie set.  Their marriage, his second, reached the fifty-year mark, one of Hollywood’s longest lasting.  Although they briefly separated because Newman had an affair during the filming of Butch Cassidy, he famously paid her the ultimate compliment: “Why fool around with hamburger when you have steak at home?”

If those aren’t the words spoken by a gentleman, what are?

© 2013 Susan Marg – All Rights Reserved

 

post

You Know You’re Getting Old When…

 

… you remember Bob Hope, George Burns, and Jack Benny.

 

“You know you’re getting old when the candles cost more than the cake.” — Bob Hope (1903-2003)

Bob Hope, 1940, in a trailer for The Ghost Breakers. Hope began his career on the radio and in the movies in 1934. He started his regular TV specials in 1954 and hosted the Academy Awards fourteen times from 1941 to 1978.

Bob Hope, 1940, in a trailer for The Ghost Breakers. Hope began his career on the radio and in the movies in 1934. He started his regular TV specials in 1954 and hosted the Academy Awards fourteen times from 1941 to 1978.

Hope continued doing USO tours into the 1980s and appeared on television into the 1990s.  When asked on his deathbed where he wanted to be buried, Hope, always with the one -liners, replied, "Surprise me."

Hope continued doing USO tours into the 1980s and appeared on television into the 1990s. When asked on his deathbed where he wanted to be buried, Hope, always with the one -liners, replied, “Surprise me.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“You know you’re getting old when you stoop to tie your shoelaces and wonder what else you could do while you’re down there.” — George Burns (1896-1996)

George Burns, in the 1980s. Gracie died in 1964 at the age of 69, but Burns, like Hope, lived to be one hundred years old. He was interred with his wife, the crypt's marker reading "Gracie Allen & George Burns --Together Again."

George Burns, in the 1980s. Gracie died in 1964 at the age of 69, but Burns, like Hope, lived to be one hundred years old. He was interred with his wife, the crypt’s marker reading “Gracie Allen & George Burns –Together Again”.

George Burns and Gracie Allen, 1955. They were vaudeville partners before they married in 1926 , and they got their start in the movies in the early thirties. Their television show aired in the fifties.

George Burns and Gracie Allen, 1955. They were vaudeville partners before they married in 1926 , and they got their start in the movies in the early thirties. Their television show aired in the fifties.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Age is strictly a case of mind over matter. If you don’t mind, it doesn’t matter.” — Jack Benny (1894-1974)

Benny returned to films with a cameo in 1963 in It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.  In 1974, he was roasted on The Dean Martin Celebrity Roast. His roasting of Lucille Ball several months later was his last public performance.

Benny returned to films with a cameo in 1963 in It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World. In 1974 he was roasted on The Dean Martin Celebrity Roast. His roasting of Lucille Ball several months later was his last public performance.

Benny, 1933. Benny was already the host of NBC's weekly radio program The Jack Benny Show.  In character, he would claim to be 39 years old, as he is here, regardless of his actual age.

Benny, 1933. Benny was already the host of NBC’s weekly radio program The Jack Benny Show. In character, he would claim to be 39 years old, as he is here, regardless of his actual age.

gallery
"I think my mouth just opens, and I spontaneously say things that occur to me." -- Helena Bonham Carter (Photo by: David Torcivia

“I think my mouth just opens, and I spontaneously say things that occur to me.” — Helena Bonham Carter (Photo by: David Torcivia)

Seen and heard

on Hollywood Boulevard:

“Lovely ladies waiting for a bite.”

Les Miserables

 

 

"My idea of a movie star is Joan Crawford, who can chew up two directors and three producers before lunch." -- Shelley Winters (Photo of Joan Crawford by George Hurrell)

“My idea of a movie star is Joan Crawford, who can chew up two directors and three producers before lunch.” — Shelley Winters (Photo of Joan Crawford by George Hurrell)

"I knew that with a mouth like mine, I just hadda be a star or something." --Barbra Streisand (Photo by: Allan Warren)

“I knew that with a mouth like mine, I just hadda be a star or something.” –Barbra Streisand (Photo by: Allan Warren)

"I ate a bug once.  It was flying around me. I was trying to get it away. It went right in my mouth." -- Hilary Duff (Photo by: David Shankbone)

“I ate a bug once. It was flying around me. I was trying to get it away. It went right in my mouth.” — Hilary Duff (Photo by: David Shankbone)

"I have a mouth, and I'm not afraid to use it." --Megan Fox (Photo by: Nicoles Genim)

“I have a mouth, and I’m not afraid to use it.” –Megan Fox (Photo by: Nicoles Genim)

post

Change is Such Hard Work.

IMG_1505

The theme of this website is “the more things change…” I thought I’d return to my roots by sharing some thoughts on “change.”  This is not the kind of change you carry around in your pocket, but real, honest-to-goodness change, the type of change at which you have to work.

From poets, presidents, jokesters, songsters, hipsters, fashionistas, and others:

I put a dollar in one of those change machines. Nothing changed.

—  George Carlin

Change is such hard work.

—  Billy Crystal

Fashion changes, but style endures.

—  Coco Chanel

Change. Not always a pretty sight. In fact, it could get pretty ugly.

—  The Narrator, The Wonder Years

If you don’t change your beliefs, your life will be like this forever. Is that good news?

—  W. Somerset Maugham

Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.

—  George Bernard Shaw

They always say time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself.

—  Andy Warhol, The Philosophy of Andy Warhol

We are the change we have been waiting for.

—  Barack Obama

If you want to make enemies, try to change something.

—  Woodrow Wilson

This is a new year. A new beginning. And things will change.

—  Taylor Swift

It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.

—  Charles Darwin

One day spent with someone you love can change everything.

—  Mitch Albom, For One More Day

post

View and Review

Book CoverThis review is by John Burroughs for Midwest Book Review and reposted below:

Hollywood or Bust: Movie Stars Dish on Following Their Dreams, Making It Big, and Surviving in Tinseltown collects more than 500 quotes, wisecracks, tell-it-like-it-is tips, and words of wisdom from popular stars and directors, including Ben Affleck to Jackie Chan, George Clooney, Carole Burnett, and many more. Grouped by subject, these vignettes offer a condensed glimpse of the trials and tribulations of the showbiz industry, and are just plain fun for a quick browse anytime. Hollywood or Bust also makes an excellent gift book for anyone who loves TV and movies! “I’d say the cut-off point for leading ladies today is thirty-five to forty whereas half the men in Hollywood get their start then. It’s a terrible double standard.” -Kathleen Turner, actress

——————————————

To view the original on the Midwest Book Review Bookwatch – August 2013, scroll down seven categories to Burroughs’ Bookshelf.